INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURE & BIOLOGY 1560–8530/2001/03–4–507–509 http://www.ijab.org

Effect of NaCl Salinity on Yield Parameters of Some Sugarcane Genotypes SHAMSHAD AKHTAR, ABDUL WAHID, MUHAMMAD AKRAM AND EJAZ RASUL Department of Botany, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad–38040, Pakistan

ABSTRACT An experiment was conducted in tanks to study the economic yield attributes of sugarcane genotypes under 2.5 (control), 8 and 12 dS m-1 levels of salinity, in three differentially salt tolerant genotypes i.e. CPF-213, CP-43/33 (tolerant) and L-116 (sensitive). At high levels of salinity i.e. 12 dS m-1, the genotypes CPF-213 and CP-43/33 exhibited higher yield of juice, sucrose and cane yield etc., while L-116 responded poorly for these parameters. Possible reasons for the reduced yield of cane varieties under salinity have been discussed. Key Words: Glycophyte; Juice; Salinity; Sucrose; Sugarcane

INTRODUCTION Rapidly increasing salinization of soil is causing great reduction in plant growth by hampering various physiological phenomena (Maas, 1986). Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a glycophyte and has been ranked as moderately sensitive to salinity (Rozeff, 1995). Globally, about one million hectares of land under sugarcane cultivation is affected by salinity or sodicity as this crop is confined to the tropical or subtropical areas (Rozeff, 1995). Plant tolerance to salinity is usually appraised as the absolute/relative growth or yield of crop in saline conditions (Qureshi et al., 1990; Wahid et al., 1997a). This is also a useful criterion for expression of salt tolerance (Maas & Hoffman, 1977). Sprouting and early growth stages are considerably more resistant to salinity than do the later developmental stages (Wahid et al., 1997a). Rozeff (1995) noted a 50% reduction in sprouting of sugarcane at 13.3 dS m-1 while same reduction of yield at 9.5 dS m -1 salinity. The salts interfere with sugar production in two-fold manner, first by affecting growth rate and yield of the cane and secondly by affecting the sucrose content of the stalk. Numerous investigations have touched on the effects of soil salinity on stripped cane yield, sucrose yield and physiology (Lingle & Weigand, 1997). In sugarcane, the yield components include stripped cane yield, sucrose percentage per stalk, extractable juice per stalk and brix percentage in the cane stalk. This paper reports changes in the yield and related attributes of a standard (CP-43/33), selected tolerant (CPF-213) and sensitive (L-116) genotypes of sugarcane under three levels of salinity i.e. control (2.5 dS m-1), 8 and 12 dS m-1.

MATERIALS AND METHODS Plant material. Genotypes of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) selected for this study were rigorously screened previously under NaCl salinity application. CPF-

213 with salt tolerance limit (EC50) of 18.5 dS m-1 and L-116 with EC50 of 11.2 dS m-1 were declared salt tolerant and sensitive, respectively (Akhtar, 2000). CP-43/33 designated as standard genotype, had previously been established as salt tolerant (Wahid et al., 1997a). Experimental and growth details. Experiment was conducted in tanks (7×3.5×0.6-m (deep) filled with a loam soil (20 metric tonnes) and lined with a double layer of polyethylene sheets, during 1994-95 and 1995-96. Experiment was laid out in completely randomized fashion with three replications. Physico-chemical characteristics of the soil determined with standard methods (Qureshi & Barrett-Lennard, 1998) were; organic matter 1.2%, total N 0.72%, cation exchange capacity 16.7 meq 100 g-1, pH 7.6, ECe 2.5, sodium adsorption ratio 0.17, Na+ 2.48 mmol L-1, Cl- 8.4 mmol L-1, SO42- 3.6 mmol L-1 and Ca+Mg 30 mmol L-1, as determined from extracted solution of the soil paste. Twenty-four single noded sets of each genotype were planted in tanks. After the emergence of sprouts, 12 plants per tank were finally retained to maintain at least 30-cm row to row and plant to plant distance. Average temperature during the experimental year 1995-96 was between 36±5oC (summer March to September) and 17±6oC (winter October to February); relative humidity 62±3% (summer) and 78±8% (winter) and rainfall was 390 mm. Treatment application. Two salinity levels i.e. 8 and 12 dS m-1 were developed at maturity stages (270 days after planting) using NaCl (99% pure). Dissolving NaCl in tap water gradually developed salinity levels in six days. The plants were irrigated with subsoil water (EC=0.8 dS m-1; SAR=4.9) whenever needed. Agronomically recommended dozes of N, P and K (150, 100 and 100 kg ha-1, respectively) were split to add at three intervals i.e., 50, 150 and 250 days after planting. The ECe of the soil was checked at the termination of experiment, which was slightly higher than the original ECe of the soil. Harvesting, measurements and statistics. Plants were harvested 80 days after the application of salinity. Cane stalks were cut at ground level, stripped and determined for

AKHTAR et al. / Int. J. Agri. Biol., Vol. 3, No. 4, 2001

fresh weight per plant. Stalk girth was recorded using a vernier caliper and juice was extracted using a mechanical extractor. Sucrose content of juice was measured using the method of Horecker (1966) and expressed in percentage. Data for different parameters were analyzed using MSTATC programme.

(Table I). Increased root zone salinity reduced the sucrose content of all the genotypes but the maximum reduction was noted in the sensitive genotype, L-116 (Fig.1e). The exhibition of higher economic yield under salinity is the parameter of potential interest, and it is considered as a yardstick for tolerance to salinity. One of the most important aspects of this study was to investigate the changes in the cane yield and sugar contents. The data (Table I) revealed that applied salinity reduced the stripped cane yield, but with significant genotypic difference. The reduction in cane yield was due to reduction in stalk girth and internodal length (Fig.1b, c). As osmotic pressure of the rooting medium increases by salinization, stalk weight, internode length and juice purity decrease (Rozeff, 1995). The reduction in apparent growth and yield was apparently related to the recovery of extractable cane juice and sucrose percentage in the cane stalk (Fig.1d, e). There was a substantial reduction in the sucrose levels. Sucrose content diminish as the plant functions to extract water from the soil at the expense of carbohydrate consumption (Akhtar, 2000), loss of turgor, wilting, cessation of cell enlargement, closure of stomata, reduction in photosynthesis (Meinzer et al., 1994) and interference with many basic metabolic process. In an earlier study, Wahid et al. (1997b) attributed the reduction in the sucrose content to the inhibitory effect of NaCl on the activity of key enzyme, invertase, which plays an important role in the synthesis (loading and unloading), of sugars. A non-significant change in the levels of total sugars and a significant reduction in the level of sucrose revealed that applied salinity had an adverse effect on the activity of enzymes involved in sucrose biosynthesis. These findings are in conformity to those of Hartt (1969) and Lingle and Weigand (1997) that a decrease in the content of sucrose under saline conditions was due to the adverse effect of salinity on this enzyme. As far as the differences among genotypes are concerned, there was no difference among the standard and selected tolerant genotypes, but the sensitive genotype indicated large difference (Table I). A reduction in the quantity of extractable juice was also related to a greater fresh matter yield (r=0.99; P<0.01) and extractable juice vs. cane stalk fresh weight (r=0.96; P<0.01). These data revealed that reduced uptake of water and its retention in the stalk is a main factor in determining the growth of stalk and sucrose recovery. It is, therefore, plausible that instead of ion

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Cane yield per tank. A significant (P<0.01) difference was noted among the genotypes for the cane yield along with significant (P<0.01) interaction of both the factors (Table I). There was a reduction in cane yield per tank in all the genotypes due to salinity but the effect was most prominent in L-116 (Fig.1a). Cane yield was comparable in the standard and selected tolerant genotypes, but was the lowest in the sensitive (L-116). Stalk girth. Stalk girth indicated highly significant (P<0.01) difference among three cane genotypes under increased salinity (Table I). The interaction between genotypes and salinity levels was also found to be highly significant (P<0.01). There was a general trend of decrease in stalk girth in all the genotypes but the worst effect of salinity was noted in L-116; whereas, CP-43/33 and CPF-213 indicated almost similar response under increased salinity (Fig.1b). Internodal length. All the genotypes showed highly significant (P<0.01) differences for internodal length as affected by salinity with a significant (P<0.01) interaction of genotypes and salinity (Table I). Applied salinity caused a reduction in internodal length of all the genotypes (Fig.1c), but reduction in this parameter was the lowest in the standard and tolerant genotypes as compared to the sensitive one. Extractable juice (mL) per cane stalk. The amount of extractable juice per cane stalk differed highly significantly in all the three genotypes with the increase of salinization (Table I). The interaction of genotype × salinity was also significant (P<0.05). Applied salinity lowered the quantity of extractable juice per cane stalk in all the genotypes but a sharp decrease was evident in the sensitive genotype i.e. L116 (Fig.1d). The standard tolerant (CP-43/33) and selected tolerant (CP-213) genotypes behaved in a similar manner. Sucrose content. Sucrose content of the sugarcane genotypes reduced highly significantly (P<0.01) as affected by salinity, but there was no interaction of both the factors

Table I. Analysis of variance (F-values) of some yield characteristics of cane genotypes under increased salinity SOV df Cane yield (kg/tank) Genotype (G) 2 1963.20** Salinity (S) 2 2426.43** G×S 4 615.75** **=significant (P<0.01); NS=non-significant

Stalk girth (cm) 4.84** 20.59** 1.18**

Internodal length (cm) Extractable Juice (mL) 17.02** 239.23** 102.07** 281.16** 11.75** 71.29**

508

Sucrose (%) 9.87** 76.91** 0.23NS

EFFECT OF SALINITY ON YIELD OF SOME SUGARCANE GENOTYPES / Int. J. Agri. Biol., Vol. 3, No. 4, 2001

Fig. 1. Some economic yield responses of sugarcane genotypes under control (2.5 dS m-1) levels of salinity

Meinzer, F.C., Z. Plaut and N.Z. Saliendra, 1994. Carbon isotope discrimination, gas exchange, and growth of sugarcane cultivars under salinity. Plant Physiol., 104: 521–6. Qureshi, R.H. and E.G. Barrett-Lennard, 1998. Saline Agriculture for Irrigated Land in Pakistan: A Handbook. ACIAR, Canbarra, Australia. Qureshi, R.H., A. Rashid and N. Ahmad, 1990. A procedure for quick screening of wheat cultivars for salt tolerance. In: N. EI-Bassam, M. Damborth and B.C. Laughman (Eds.), Genetic Aspects of Plant Mineral Nutrition, pp: 315–24. Kluwer Academic Publications, The Netherlands. Rozeff, N., 1995. Sugarcane and salinity – a review paper. Sugarcane, 5: 8– 19. Wahid, A., A.R. Rao and E. Rasul, 1997a. Identification of salt tolerance traits in sugarcane lines. Field Crop Res., 54: 9–17. Wahid, A., E. Rasul and A.R. Rao, 1997b. Germination responses of sensitive and tolerant sugarcane lines to sodium chloride. Seed Sci. Technol., 25: 465–70.

toxicity, reduced water content was a crippling factor in giving reduced stripped cane yield in sugarcane. This was due to the fact that, being a C4 crop, it has higher requirement of water for normal growth and development (Deitz & Harris, 1997).

REFERENCES Akhtar, S., 2000. Some morpho-anatomical and physiological studies on sugarcane under salinity. Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Botany, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan. Dietz, K.J. and G.C. Harris, 1997. Photosynthesis under nutrient deficiency. In: M. Pessarakli (Ed.), Handbook of Photosynthesis, pp: 951–75. Marcel Dekker Press Inc. New York. Hartt, C.E., 1969. Effect of potassium deficiency upon translocation of C14 in attached blades and entire plants of sugarcane. Plant Physiol., 44: 1461–9. Horecker, B.L., 1966. Monnitol dehydrogenase (crystalline) from Lactobacillus brevis. In: W.A. Wood (Ed.). Methods In Enzymology, Vol. 9, pp: 143–6. Lingle, S.E. and C.L. Weigand, 1997. Soil salinity and sugarcane juice quality. Field Crop Res., 54: 259–68. Maas, E.V., 1986. Salt tolerance in plants. Appl. Agric. Res., 1: 12–26. Maas, E.V. and G.J. Hoffman, 1977. Crop salt tolerance-current assessment. J. Irrig. Drain. Div. Amer. Soc. Civil. Engg., 103: 115–34.

(Received 23 April 2001; Accepted 08 July 2001)

509

Effect of NaCl Salinity on Yield Parameters of Some ...

Data for different parameters were analyzed using MSTAT-. C programme. ... recovery of extractable cane juice and sucrose percentage in the cane stalk (Fig.1d ...

204KB Sizes 0 Downloads 234 Views

Recommend Documents

Effect of saline water on growth, biochemical parameters and yield ...
to grow and yield under saline conditions show certain physiological attributes which make the crops adapted to salinity. Irrigation water with high chloride ...

Effect of Salinity on Biduri.pdf
There was a problem previewing this document. Retrying... Download. Connect more apps... Try one of the apps below to open or edit this item. Effect of Salinity ...

effect of nacl priming duration and concentration on ... - Core
in seed priming duration compared to control (dry seed). ... and the multiplication of radicle cells [23]. Bewley .... Gallais S, Crescenzo DE, Laval MAP, Martin.

effect of nacl priming duration and concentration on ... - Core
coefficient of velocity of fenugreek seeds and the best result was obtained with (4 .... Statistical analysis ... variance, using SPSS 13.0 software and the difference.

effect of nacl priming duration and concentration on ... - Core
2.3. Statistical analysis. All the data were subjected to an analysis of variance, using SPSS 13.0 software and the difference between means were compared by ...

EFFECT OF SHADE ON YIELD OF RICE CROPS.pdf
Page 1 of 4. 24. EFFECT OF SHADE ON YIELD OF RICE CROPS. Golam Moula*. ABSTRACT: A study was undertaken to observe the effect of shade of the trees. on the yield of paddy and green straw of two different rice varieties, local variety,. Kazol Shail an

Study and Investigate Effect of Input Parameters on ... - IJRIT
to apply DOE techniques to achieve desired design of gearbox for control the temperature and noise .... replication total 32 experiments will be performed as shown in table ΙΙ. ... will be carried out using dB meter or by using ultrasonic sensor.

Examining the effect of binary interaction parameters on ...
energy concerns continue to grow, improving the efficiencies of power and refrigeration cycles is ... Numerical simulations using empirical equations of state provide an excellent alternative ... cant source of VLE data through various modelling appr

Study and Investigate Effect of Input Parameters on Temperature and ...
Equipment Components AB SE–631 85 Eskilstuna, Sweden 2007. [12]. www.fuchs-europe.de. [13]. Industrial Gearbox Service Manual of LOCTITE. [14]. Industry Catalogue of HI-TECH DRIVES Pvt. Ltd. [15].Carl Byington, Ryan Brawrs, Sanket Amin, James Hopki

The effect of near-wellbore yield on elastic wave ...
100 MPa 90 MPa 80 MPa. 60 MPa. 60 MPa. In figure 1 the .... degrees, and a dilation angle of 15 degrees (full curves) for a cohesion of 5 MPa (top) and 2 MPa ...

Effect of growth regulators on yield, nutrient uptake ...
Table 2. Effect of genotypes and growth regulators on N,P,K and protein content and yield of seed and ... management factors and renewable energy sources.

EFFECT OF CONTROLLED ROLLING PARAMETERS ...
temperature was elevated from 1100°C to 1200°C indicated that copper ... The strain degree applied during the roughing phase increased the ageing response ...

INHERITANCE MECHANISM OF SOME YIELD COMPONENTS IN.pdf
There was a problem previewing this document. Retrying... Download. Connect more apps... Try one of the apps below to open or edit this item. INHERITANCE ...

Effect of salinity stress on in vitro propagation of ...
Sodium chloride is a strong osmotic agent and it affects the growth ... All data were statistically processed using .... Changes after Exposure to and Recovery from.

Effect of salinity in certain exzyme activity, physiological ...
(Key words: Salt tolerance, Rice, ATPase, NRase,. Soluble protein and Proline content). Salt tolerance capacity of plants depends on the species as well as the type of salt in the soils. The supression of plant growth increases with rise in the conce

Effect of foliar spraying of nutrients on seed yield, split ...
Apr 5, 1990 - Dept. of Seed Science and Technology, Tamil Nadu Agrl. Univ., Coimbatore-641 003, Tamil Nadu. .... Kumar, B. and Singh, V.P. (1997). Zinc.

IMPACT OF SALINITY ON THE GROWTH OF Avicennia ...
osmotic pressure of 4.3166 MPa against ostomatic pressures of their surrounding water of 0.9968 ..... Mangrove regeneration and management. Mimeograph.

Effect of shade and spacing on growth, yield and quality of black ...
Irrespective of the quantum of shade, the senescence was delayed by about a ... shade and spacing on growth, yield and quality of black musli.pdf. Open. Extract.

Research Article Evaluation of yield potential and some ...
cluster analysis independently of geographical origins. ... adapted and high forage yielding in North African .... yield or for adaptation to North African climates.

Various irrigation cycles effect on grain yield, proline ...
Abstract: Drought stress globally affects the growth and production of plants. Wheat is an important crop whose research in this aspect is highly noticeable related to food quality. In recent study, the effects of two different irrigation cycles (wee

Transgressive segregation for yield and yield components in some ...
J. 90 (1-3) : 152-154 January-March 2003. Research Notes. Transgressive segregation for yield and yield components in some inter and intra specific crosses of desi cotton. T. PRADEEP AND K. SUMALINI. Agricultural Research Station, ANGRAU, Mudhol - 50