Electric field induced orientational order of gold nanorods in dilute organic suspensions Jake Fontana,1, a) Greice K. B. da Costa,2 Joao M. Pereira,3 Jawad Naciri,1 Banahalli R. Ratna,1 Peter Palffy-Muhoray,4 and Isabel C. S. Carvalho3 1)

Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Ave. Washington, D.C. 20375 Photonic and Instrumentation Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Program, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitária, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 3) Physics Department, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), Gávea, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 4) Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44240, U.S.A. 2)

( Dated: date; Received textdate; Revised textdate; Accepted textdate; Published textdate)

The electric field controlled alignment of gold nanorods offers a new paradigm for anisotropic molecules with the potential for a wide variety of phases and structures. We experimentally study the optical absorption from gold nanorod suspensions aligned using external electric fields. We show that the absorption from these suspensions depends linearly on the orientational order parameter. We provide evidence that the critical electric field needed to orient the gold nanorods is proportional to the nanorod volume and depolarization anisotropy. Utilizing this critical field dependence we demonstrate for suspensions with two different nanorod sizes that the alignment of each population can be controlled. We also develop a technique to determine the imaginary parts of the longitudinal and transverse electric susceptibilities of the nanorods. The ability to selectively address specific parts of the nanorod populations in a mixture using external fields may have significant potential for future display and optical filter applications. Unlike individual anisotropic molecules, the anisotropy of the electric susceptibility of gold nanorods is sufficiently large to allow alignment by electric fields. Due to both their elongated shape and relatively large size, coupling to an external electric field can be comparable to the energy of thermal excitations.1,2 As a consequence, the alignment, and hence the optical properties of a colloidal suspension of gold nanorods can be controlled by electric fields, opening the door to a variety of applications. These suspensions are expected to have faster switching times and be significantly thinner than current liquid crystal based displays, they do not require surface alignment layers, and they are continuously color tunable and chemically stable, unlike dichroic dyes.3 The purpose of this paper is to describe experiments demonstrating such field induced optical alignment, and to compare the observations with theory. Controlling the orientation of short aspect ratio plasmonic nanorods in suspensions using electric fields has proved challenging, yet it is essential for access to the full range of possible optical properties.4—14 The alignment of long (aspect ratio 10) nanorods in aqueous solvents using external electric fields, where only the transverse absorption peak was in the visible spectrum, has been demonstrated.10 Short nanorods, where both plasmon resonances are in the visible, do not align well in such systems. Previous work has shown by coating the nanorods with polymeric ligands and then phase transferring into organic solvents, makes the alignment of short

a ) Electronic

mail: [email protected]

aspect ratio nanorods in external low frequency electric fields possible.4—6 We consider ellipsoids to represent the gold nanorods under study, since analytic solutions to Maxwell’s equations, which are required to calculate the energy of the nanorod-field interactions, exist for ellipsoids but not for finite length cylinders. The energy,  , of a dielectric ellipsoid with principal semi-axis lengths of   and  and dielectric permittivity 1 embedded in a homogeneous dielectric medium of permittivity 2 in an externally applied uniform electric field E is given by2 2 1  = − (1 − 2 )( (E · ˆ a)2 1 −2 3 1 + 2  +

1

1+

(E 1 −2 2 

ˆ 2+ · b)

1

1+

(E 1 −2 2 

·ˆ c)2 )

(1)

ˆ and ˆ where ˆ a, b c are unit vectors along the principal axes, and  is the depolarizing factor associated with the ˆ a-direction. As predicted by Drude theory15 , the dielectric permittivity of metals, neglecting losses, is rea³ ´ 2

sonably well represented by 1 ' 0 1 − 2 , where  is the frequency,  is the plasma frequency and 0 is the permittivity of free space. For Au,  ' 2 × 1015 . At low frequencies, therefore, 1 is large and negative, and in the limit where    , the expression for the energy becomes 2  = − 2 3

µ

¶ 1 1 1 2 2 2 ˆ (E · ˆ a) + (E · b) + (E · ˆ c)    (2)

102 If  = , the ellipsoid is uniaxial, and the energy becomes µ ¶ ¶ µ 2 1 1 1 ³ ˆ ´2  = − 2  2  · ˆ (3) + − 3 ⊥ k ⊥ where k and ⊥ are the depolarizing factors for fields parallel and perpendicular axis ˆ c. ³ to ³ the´ symmetry ´ 2 1+ In this case, k = 1− ln − 2 , where  = 23 1− q ¡ ¢2 1 −  is the eccentricity, and since the trace of the depolarizing factor tensor is unity, ⊥ = (1−k )2 . If  is the angle between ˆ c, the symmetry axis of the nanorod and the applied field E, and noting that the volume of the ellipsoid is  = 43 , we finally have for the potential energy µ ¶ µ ¶ 1 1 1 1 2 2  () = −  2  + − (4) cos  2 ⊥ k ⊥

where  is the refractive index of the host and 0 is the free space wavelength. Absorption by the sample therefore depends linearly on the orientational order of the nanorods, which can be controlled by the applied field. For simplicity, we write  =  + 

(9)

where  = 32 (”k + 2”⊥ ) and  = − 32 (”k − ”⊥ ) 0  0  are wavelength-dependent material parameters of the nanorod suspension.

In thermal equilibrium, the orientational probability distribution function  () is just the Boltzmann distribution, 2

 () =

 R1 0

where

v u u  = t



− cos2  2 

2 −  2 cos2  

0  

2  ³ 1 k

(5)

(cos )



1 ⊥

´

(6)

is the critical field needed to align the nanorods and 2 = 0  where  is the permittivity of the host. If    , the distribution is nearly uniform; if    , it is sharply peaked around  = 0 and  = . A convenient measure order is the order ­ ¡ of orientational ¢® parameter,  = 12 3 cos2  − 1 , where the brackets indicate the ensemble average. Explicitly, R1

2

−  cos2 

( 1 (3 cos2  − 1) 2 (cos ) = 0 2 R 2 2 1 − 2 cos    (cos ) 0

(7)

The optical properties of the colloidal nanorod suspension depend on the degree of orientational order. The dielectric permittivity of the system is given in6 ; for light propagating along the applied field direction, as in our experiments, the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity due to absorption ´ by the nanorods is ³  ” ” ” ” ” = + 2 ) − ( −  ) , where  is the vol( ⊥ ⊥ k k 0 3

ume fraction of nanorods, ”k and ”⊥ are the wavelengthdependent imaginary parts of the longitudinal and transverse principal values of the nanorod susceptibility. In the dilute limit, the absorption coefficient, , is thus µ ¶ ´ 4 ” 2 ³ ” = = (k + 2”⊥ ) − (”k − ”⊥ ) 0 2 0 30  (8)

FIG. 1. (color online) () Schematic of the experimental setup. Experimental absorption spectra for gold nanorods suspended in toluene as a function of external electric field, ranging from  = 0 (thick solid black line) to  = max ≈ 5 ( )(thick dashed black line). () 1024, 1024 = 52 × 10−6 ; () 2575, 2575 = 34 × 10−5 ; () 50145, 50145 = 47 × 10−5 .

Experiments were carried out to study how gold nanorods suspended in organic solvents align in low frequency external electric fields. Gold nanorods with diameter ( = 2) to length ( = 2) ratios () of 1024 , 2575  and 50145  were acquired commercially (Nanopartz, Inc.). The nanorods were dispersed into toluene using a previously developed phase¢ ¡ transfer technique;4,5,16 the nanorods 1  10−8  were placed into a 20  glass vial containing a 1  solution of tetrahydrofuran and thiol terminated polystyrene (Polymer Source Inc., 25 ,  = 50,  = 53) and vigorously shaken. Upon shaking the nanorods flocculate onto the side of the glass vial. The vial is then put to rest on a table for 15 minutes. The remaining water and tetrahydrofuran is decanted and the vial is dried with nitrogen gas. 1  of toluene ( = 22) is then added into the vial, the vial is shaken again, suspending the nanorods. Indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates (1  thick) were glued to the outside of a cuvette (Starna cells

103 Inc., 035 , 1  path length, 3  total thickness) containing the gold nanorods suspended in toluene as depicted in Fig. 1(a). The cuvette is submersed into a tank containing transformer oil (Clearco STO-50) to prevent dielectric breakdown. A high voltage transformer (Franceformer 1530P, 15  , 60 ) controlled with a variable transformer (Variac) is used to apply a voltage across the cuvette, aligning the nanorods in the suspension. The absorption of light by the nanorod suspensions is probed with an unpolarized light source and measured with a spectrometer (OceanOptics HL-2000 white light source and Redtide USB650). In our experimental geometry, as the nanorods begin to align in the field, the longitudinal absorption peak (e.g. 892  for 50145) begins to decrease and the transverse peak (e.g. 525  for 50145) increases in magnitude, since the propagation of the probe light is parallel to the applied field. As the ³ nanorod ´ volume,  , and depolar1 1 ization anisotropy k − ⊥ increases going from Fig. 1(b) to Fig. 1(d) the change in the absorption at the longitudinal wavelength peak also increases. From our model, we have that =+

R1 0

FIG. 2. (a) Order parameter versus the square of the applied electric field for suspensions 50145 (circles), 2575 (squares) and 1024 (triangles). The solid black lines are the calculated fits from the experimentally determined ,  and  parameters: where 1024 = 366 −1 , 1024 = −903 −1 , 1024 = 0111 ( )2 ; 2575 = 1720 −1 , 2575 = −1074 −1 , 2575 = 0255 ( )2 ; and 50145 = 347 −1 , 50145 = −244 −1 , 50145 = 0503 ( )2 . (b) Absorption versus order parameter of the three suspensions.

 parameters. Fig. 2(b) also demonstrates that the absorption is linear in the order parameter, verifying the relationship derived in Eqn. (9).

2

−  cos2 

( 12 (3 cos2  − 1) 2 (cos ) 2 2 R 1 − cos   2 (cos ) 0

(10)

and experimentally, we measure  as function of . By fitting the experimental measurements of  versus  to the model, we can determine the material parameters   and   If no external electric field is applied then the nanorod suspension is isotropic and  = 0. It follows that  = 0 where 0 is the absorption by the suspension with no field applied. Letting  =  − 0 =  and rewriting the Eqn. (7) ¢ R1 ¡ R1 2 2 as  = Ψ ( ) = 0 12 32 − 1   0  , −2 where  = cos (),  =  2 , and  =  , we then have  = Ψ. To determine  and , a least square fit of the experimental  and  data is used, that is  2 = P 2 2  ( − Ψ (  )). Minimizing  with respect to  P P Ψ  and  gives  =  Ψ 2 and  Ψ0 −  ΨΨ0 = 0 P ,³  respectively. Therefore  is given when  Ψ0 − ´P Ψ  Ψ  2 . Once ,  and  ΨΨ0 = 0, where Ψ0 =  Ψ are determined,  () can be determined. The order parameter determined from the  values for all three suspensions, 50145  (circles), 2575  (squares) and 1024  (triangles), as a function of  is depicted in Fig. 2(a). The order parameter maxima 50145 2575 1024 are max = 088, max = 073, and max = 041 showing a clear dependence of the degree of alignment on nanorod size. The solid black lines are the calculated fits from the experimentally determined ,  and

FIG. 3. Theoretical and experimental critical electric field versus nanorod volume and depolarization anisotropy.

The theoretical critical electric field to align the nanorods as a function of the product of nanorod volume and depolarization anisotropy (solid black line) is shown in Fig. 3. The critical electric field can also be determined from the experimentally derived  = −2 parameter. We find in Fig. 3 that the experimental slope is exp = −014 and the slope predicted from Eqn. (6) is  = −05. The difference in slope between the theory and experiment indicates the shortcomings of our simple model. The nanorod volume, depolarization anisotropy and subsequent critical electric field are governed by shape. Here our model assumes the nanorods to be ellipsoids, yet spherocylinders are more accurate representations. However, no analytic solutions are available for the polarization for spherocylinders or other nonellipsoidal bodies. Refinement of the nanorod shape in the model would likely improve the agreement between the experimental data and theory in Fig. 3.

From the experimentally extracted  and , deter-

104 TABLE I. Imaginary longitudinal and transverse principal values of the nanorod susceptibility. nanorod 1024 2575 50145

0 ()



692 744 892

52 × 10−6 34 × 10−5 47 × 10−5

”k

”⊥

17 20 37

87 33 05

mined at the longitudinal absorption peak wavelength, the imaginary longitudinal and transverse electric susceptibilities of the nanorods are given by ”k =

0  ( − 2) 2

(11)

”⊥ =

0  ( + ) 2

(12)

and

Table I gives the extracted susceptibilities for all three sizes of nanorods . The relative susceptibility anisotropy, ”k ”⊥ , increases with increasing nanorod size, but the magnitudes are larger for the smaller nanorods. The uncertainty in the susceptibilities are relatively large due to the inherently large uncertainty in the volume fraction of the nanorods in the suspension, ∆ ' 01. This extraction technique demonstrates it is possible to determine a fundamental material property of the nanorods. Making use of the critical field alignment relationship demonstrated above, a mixture of two different sizes of nanorods (1024 and 50145) was prepared; its absorption spectrum is shown in Fig. 4(a). Initially with no field applied (thick solid line) there are three absorption peaks corresponding to the transverse absorption at 524  from the contributions of both nanorod populations, the longitudinal absorption at 692  from the 1024 nanorods and the longitudinal absorption at 892  from the 50145 nanorods. As the field is applied both longitudinal peaks decrease in magnitude. The change in absorption for the 892  peak is significantly larger than the absorption change for the 692  peak as expected at  = 5 ( ) (thick dashed line). The order parameter at both absorption peaks (50145 = 892 , 1024 = 692 ) was calculated and is depicted in Fig. 4(b). The maximum order parameter at 892  50145 1024 is max = 091 and max = 070 at 692. In summary, we have experimentally studied the optical properties of aligned gold nanorod suspensions using external electric fields. We have shown that the absorption from these suspensions depends linearly on the orientational order parameter. We provide evidence that the critical electric field for alignment is proportional to the nanorod volume and depolarization anisotropy. We have developed a technique to extract the imaginary parts

of the longitudinal and transverse susceptibilities of the

FIG. 4. (a) Experimental absorption spectrum for a mixture of gold nanorods (1024 and 50145) suspended in toluene as a function of applied electric field. (b) Order parameter versus the square of the applied electric field for the 1024, 50145 suspension calculated at 692  (triangles) and 892  (circles). The solid lines are the calculated fits from the experimentally determined ,  and  parameters: where 1024 = 700 −1 , 1024 = −285 −1 , 1024 = 0239 ( )2 and 50145 = 950 −1 , 50145 = −629 −1 , 50145 = 0687 ( )2 .

nanorods. We have also demonstrated that for mixtures of two different nanorod sizes the alignment for each population can be controlled. The electric field controlled alignment of gold nanorods may offer a new paradigm for anisotropic molecules. This work was supported with funding provided from the Office of Naval Research Global under ONRGNICOP-N62909-15-1-N016. I. C. S. Carvalho and P. Palffy-Muhoray thank the CNPq-PVE collaboration project for financial support. 1 P.

G. d. Gennes and J. Prost, The Physics of Liquid Crystals (Clarendon Press, New York, NY, 1995). 2 S. J. Adams, Electromagnetic Theory (McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, NY, 1941). 3 P. Collings and M. Hird, Introduction to Liquid Crystals: Chemistry and Physics (CRC Press, Philadelphia, PA, 1997). 4 J. Fontana, P. Palffy-Muhoray, N. Kotov, and A. Agarwal, in American Physical Society March Meeting (2008). 5 J. P. Fontana, Thesis, Kent State University (2011). 6 X. Y. Zheng, J. Fontana, M. Pevnyi, M. Ignatenko, S. Wang, R. Vaia, and P. Palffy-Muhoray, J. Mater. Sci. 47, 4914 (2012). 7 Q. Liu, B. Senyuk, J. Tang, T. Lee, J. Qian, S. He, and I. I. Smalyukh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 088301 (2012). 8 Q. Liu, J. Tang, Y. Zhang, A. Martinez, S. Wang, S. He, T. J. White, and I. I. Smalyukh, Phys. Rev. E 89, 052505 (2014). 9 A. B. Golovin and O. D. Lavrentovich, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95 (2009). 1 0 B. van der Zande, G. Koper, and H. Lekkerkerker, J. Phys. Chem. 103 (1999). 1 1 D. Xie, M. Lista, G. G. Qiao, and D. E. Dunstan, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 3815 (2015). 1 2 Q. Liu, M. G. Campbell, J. S. Evans, and I. I. Smalyukh, Adv. Mater. 26, 7178 (2014). 1 3 Q. K. Liu, Y. X. Cui, D. Gardner, X. Li, S. L. He, and I. I. Smalyukh, Nano Lett. 10, 1347 (2010). 1 4 S. Umadevi, X. Feng, and T. Hegmann, Adv. Funct. Mater. 23, 1393 (2013). 1 5 C. F. Bohren and D. R. Huffman, Absorption and Scattering of Light by Small Particles (Wiley-VCH, New York, NY, 1983). 1 6 J. Fontana, J. Naciri, R. Rendell, and B. R. Ratna, Adv. Opt. Mater. 1, 100 (2013).

Electric field induced orientational order of gold ...

4) Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44240, U.S.A.. ( Dated: date; Received textdate; Revised ..... project for financial support. 1 P. G. d. Gennes and J. Prost, The ...

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