Parallel Computing System for the efficient calculation of Molecular Similarity based on Negative Electrostatic Potentials

Proposal for Universidad Nacional de Colombia for the degree of Master in Computer Science and Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering 2009

Raul Ernesto Torres Carvajal

Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering

Contents 1 Introduction

4

1.1 The TARIS method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5

1.2 Other tree comparison methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7

1.3 GPU Parallel Computing in Molecular chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

8

1.4 Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9

2 Theoretical Background

11

2.1 Kernel Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

11

2.1.1 Kernels for Structured Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

12

1

List of Figures 2.1 Embedding to the feature space in order to find linear relationships 12

2

Abstract

We present a proposal of using GPU parallel computing for improving performance and execution time for the TARIS method (Tree Analysis and Representation of Isopotencial Surfaces), developed by the Theoretical Chemistry Group of Universidad Nacional de Colombia, which is a novel Alignment-Independent Method for calculating the molecular similarity based in the negative electrostatic potential.The method achieves a good characterization of molecules by converting the information of the negative isopotencial surfaces in a tree-based representation. However, TARIS is based in a serial algorithm programming paradigm; it doesn’t´t take advantage of the inherent parallelism of the information extraction, tree construction and comparison processes for a set of molecules. Furthermore, in the tree comparison process problem, the autors only have implemented the edit distance algorithm, so it´s not possible to know how good is this metric compared with other solutions; so, we also want to explore other solutions for the tree comparison problem, specially in machine learning methods known as Kernel Methods, which are strong algorithms for pattern recognition and they have been successfully used over structured data as strings and graphs.

3

Chapter 1 Introduction

T

HE

problem of Molecule comparison is not new and there is a lot of

approaches from computational chemistry that had tried to solve it.

These approaches may be classified in two broad categories[9]. AlignmentDependent Methods are those that need to find the most perfect match between the molecules in a 3D space, which is a difficult challenge because of the large number of possibilities in which two molecules can be arranged, so, a “brute-force” method is unfeasible. Counter wise, AlignmentIndependent Methods are those based on finite molecular characteristics named scalar fields; this fields are strong enough to characterize the molecule as single entity without worrying for the arrangement in the three-dimensional space. One of those methods is TARIS (Tree Analysis and Representation of Isopotencial Surfaces), developed by the Theoretical Chemistry Group of Universidad Nacional de Colombia [10, 12]; TARIS only uses the negative values of the scalar field named Electrostatic Potential to achieve a good characterization of molecules; it con-

4

verts the information of the negative isopotencial surfaces in a tree-based representation (trees are an special case of graphs), being trees one of the most studied combinatorial structures in computer science [1] The tree approach has been very successful in several science fields (e.g. in comparison of DNA secondary structures), demonstrating the utility of simplifying the features of the study object. However, TARIS is based in a serial algorithm programming paradigm; it doesn’t´t take advantage of the inherent parallelism of the information extraction, tree construction and comparison processes; the calculations are limited in timescale and size by the available computing resources; so, in very large sets of molecules, the execution time increases considerably. Furthermore, approximately accurate results have been obtained from the tree comparison process using the edit distance, but it´s necessary to prove another methods to know how good is this metric coma pared with other solutions. One of the alternatives is to use a parallelized form of edit distance. Other can explore some variants of graph isomorphism. There are a particular techniques in machine learning called Kernel methods that have been successfully applied in pattern recognition for structured data.

1.1

The TARIS method

More exactly, in TARIS, the trees are weighted in their nodes, registering the electrostatic potential value of a given surface. The method starts by searching isopotencial surfaces at given value (e.g. -0.15) and for each

5

founded independent surface, it creates a weighed node saving the value at that level. Next, the algorithm jumps to the following level according to the established step size (e.g. 0.02) and repeats the previous process. If some of the new surfaces envelop surfaces in the previous level, the corresponding node of that surface connects to the existing nodes as a parent node. The process repeats until the algorithm reaches the cutoff value, which is the maximum value of electrostatic potential minor to 0. A refinement step is used for simplifying the tree structure: if a parent node has only one child node, the parent node collapses with it (in other words, the method only stores the deepest node in branches with just one child). Finally, the method adds a imaginary root node, which purpose is to unite in one single tree all generated trees for a molecule. At this moment, we obtain a structure that reflects the relations between successive isopotentials surfaces. This allow us to forget the 3D representation, and concentrate the efforts in a tree comparison problem. One of the most used algorithms to tackle it is the edit distance metric. Briefly, it consists in finding the minimum-cost operations set (insert a node, delete a node, replace a node) that allows us to convert a tree in another tree. The obtained value is the distance between those two trees, and it can be used to create a similarity or dissimilarity matrix when several molecules are compared. Then, using hierarchical clustering, we can obtain the dendogram for a possible classification.

6

1.2

Other tree comparison methods

There are alternative measures in tree comparison. Sub-graph isomorphism (obtain the same graph by only changing node labels) is classified as an NP problem, but there are several optimizations that demonstrate good results in video indexing, computer vision and ligand docking [7, 8, 13, 17]; given two graphs (G1 and G2), two variants of the solution can be used: Maximum common sub-graph looks for the mayor isomorphic sub-graph of G1 with the mayor sub-graph of G2. In the same way, Minimum common super-graph tries to find the closest superior graph containing both G1 and G2. This distances showed better results than the edit distances in some applications [2]because they don’t need function costs. We can´t ignore the results in some phylogenetic trees comparison studies [4, 14], based in the Maximum Parsimony method. Another choice could be the Maximum Verisimilitude, which is like the first, but it associates some probability values to each possible solution to the problem. In the parallel computing field, In [4, 14] the authors develop comparison of phylogenetic trees under a message-passing parallel computing interface; the execution mode is Master-slave, in which there is a central processing node controlling the operations in the slave nodes. The prediction accuracy doesn´t outperforms significantly but the execution time speeds up in a notorious way. Other studies like [7] try to compare Maximum common sub-graph and Minimum common super-graph in their serial and parallel versions.

7

1.3

GPU Parallel Computing in Molecular chemistry

Graphics processors (GPUs) provide a vast number of simple, data-parallel, deeply multithreaded cores and high memory bandwidths including support for both single- and double-precision IEEE floating point arithmetic. Over time, GPU architectures are becoming increasingly programmable, offering the potential for dramatic speedups for a variety of generalpurpose applications compared to contemporary general-purpose processors (CPUs); before, GPU implementations could only be achieved using existing 3D-rendering APIs: OpenGL or DirectX [3]. NVIDIA’s offers a solution: CUDA language, an extension to C for programming over their cards without the need of mapping the instruction to a graphics API. CUDA represents the coprocessor as a device that can run a large number of threads. The threads are managed by representing parallel tasks as kernels (the sequence of work to be done in each thread) mapped over a domain (the set of threads to be invoked). Kernels are scalar and represent the work to be done at a single point in the domain. The kernel is then invoked as a thread at every point in the domain. The parallel threads share memory and synchronize using barriers. Data is prepared for processing on the GPU by copying it to the graphics board’s memory. Data transfer is performed using DMA and can take place concurrently with kernel processing. Once written, data on the GPU is persistent unless it is deallocated or overwritten, remaining available for subsequent kernels[3].

8

The abstractions and virtualization of processing resources provided by the CUDA thread block programming model allow programs to be written with GPUs that exist today but to scale to future hardware designs. Future CUDA-compatible GPUs may contain a large multiple of the number of streaming multiprocessors in current generation hardware. Wellwritten CUDA programs should be able to run unmodified on future hardware, automatically making use of the increased processing resources[16]. The impressive performance of GPUs is due, in part, to their optimized hardware for graphics. The requirements for floating-point calculations for graphics are considerably different from those for scientific computing[11].

1.4

Contributions

Our work is oriented in two branches. First, we want to improve the performance of the TARIS method by implementing parallel algorithms over GPU´s (Graphics Processors Units), which are state-of-the-art platforms for molecular related simulations and calculations, using NVIDIA cards as hardware and CUDA (Compute Unite Device Architecture) as programming environment. GPU computing offers a cheap alternative in one single machine, in contrast to expensive clusters of computers sometimes out of reach for researchers, without compromising the performance and accuracy of their experiments. It´s also a green solution, because there are great savings in electrical power, interconnected cables, computing machines and space.

9

Second, we want to explore other solutions for the tree comparison problem, specially in machine learning methods known as Kernel Methods, which are strong algorithms for pattern recognition and they have been successfully used over structured data as strings and graphs. As trees can be classified as complex and structured pieces of meaningful information, the use of these strategies could help to tackle the problem in efficient ways. Dealing with both approaches, we hope to reduce the execution time of the method and add optimal tree comparison solutions, hence TARIS becomes a good choice in the molecular similarity problem for the scientific community.

10

Chapter 2 Theoretical Background

2.1

Kernel Methods

The strategy of kernel methods are well documented in the book of Cristianini and Shawe [15]. In general it is to embed the data into a space where the patterns can be discovered as linear relations(Figure 2.1). The initial mapping component is defined implicitly the kernel function that depends on the specific data type and domain knowledge concerning the patterns that are to be expected in the particular data source. Next, we apply a pattern analysis algorithm that is general purpose, and robust. The process can be resumed in four steps: 1. Data items are embedded into a vector space called the feature space. 2. Linear relations are sought among the images of the data items in the feature space.

11

Figure 2.1: Embedding to the feature space in order to find linear relationships

3. The algorithms are implemented in such a way that the coordinates of the embedded points are not needed, only their pairwise inner products. 4. The pairwise inner products can be computed efficiently directly from the original data items using a kernel function.

2.1.1

Kernels for Structured Data

In the paper of Gartner[6] convolution kernels are proposed to be the best known kernel for representation spaces that are not mere attributevalue tuples. Their basic idea is that the semantics of composite objects can often be captured by a relation between the object and its parts; The kernel on the object is composed of kernels defined on different parts.

12

• x, x0 ∈ X are the objects • x→ , x0→ ∈ X1 × · · · × XD are the tuples of parts of these objects. • R : (X1 × · · · × XD ) × X is the relation of composition • R−1 (x) = x→ : R(x→ , x) is the decomposition relation • The convolution kernel is defined as

0

kconv (x, x ) =

X

D Y

kd (xd , x0d )

x→ ∈R−1 (x),x0→ ∈R−1 (x0 ) d=1

The advantage of convolution kernels is that they are very general and can be applied in many different situations. However, because of that generality, they require a significant amount of work to adapt them to a specific problem, which makes choosing R in real-world applications a non-trivial task. One of those applications is related with string objects, and for them, string kernels have been defined.

String kernels

Strings kernels are defined in a comprehensive way in[5]as it follows:

• A is a finite set of characters called alphabet, e.g. A = A, C, G, T • $ is a sentinel character that marks the end of a string but $ ∈ /A • A string x is any combination of the elements of A: x ∈ Ak , k = 0, 1, 2, ...

13

• The empty string belongs to Ak , and is represented by the symbol . • The non-empty strings are symbolized by A∗ . • s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z ∈ A∗ denote strings • a, b, c ∈ A denote characters • |x| denotes the length of x • uv ∈ A∗ denotes the concatenation of two strings u and v • au ∈ A∗ denotes the concatenation of a character and a string • x[i : j],1 ≤ i ≤ j ≤ |x| denote the sub-string of x between locations i and j • If x = uvw for some (possibly empty) u, v, w, G u is called a prefix of x G v is called a sub-string (v v x) G w is called a suffix of x. • numy (x)denotes the number of occurrences of y in x

The kernel they define is given by:

k(x, y) =

X

wsx δsx ,sy =

X

nums (x)nums (y)ws

s∈A∗

sx vx,sy vy

Now, these are the possible ways to obtain the value of the weight:

14

• ws = 0 for all |s| > 1: it only counts single characters (bag-ofcharacters kernel) • ws 6= 0 if and only if s is bounded by a whitespace in one or both sides (bag-of-words kernel) • ws = 0 for all |s| > n: it only counts sub-strings which length are less or equal to a given number • ws = 0 for all |s| = 6 k : it only counts sub-strings of length k (kspectrum kernel)

In the previous article they propose a new algorithm strings and trees in linear time, obviating dynamic programming. Their algorithm is supposed to be extended in various ways to provide linear time prediction cost in the length of the sequence to be classified. Additionally, they offer a way of dealing with different kinds of weights.

15

Bibliography [1] Philip Bille. Tree edit distance, alignment distance and inclusion. Technical report, IT University of Copenhagen, 2003. [2] Horst Bunke. A graph distance metric based on the maximal common subgraph. Pattern Recognition Letters, 19:255–259, 1998. [3] Shuai Che, Michael Boyer, Jiayuan Meng, David Tarjan, Jeremy W. Sheaffer, and Kevin Skadron.

A performance study of general-

purpose applications on graphics processors using cuda. J. Parallel Distrib. Comput., 68(10):1370–1380, 2008. [4] Zhihua Dua. Reconstruction of large phylogenetic trees: A parallel approach. Computational Biology and chemistry, 29:273–280, 2005. [5] Thomas Gartner, John W. Lloyd, and Peter A. Flach. Kernels for structured data. SIGKDD Explorations, 5:49–58, 2002. [6] Thomas Gartner, John W. Lloyd, and Peter A. Flach. Kernels and distances for structured data. Mach. Learn., 57(3):205–232, 2004. [7] Gupta. Finding largest subtrees and smallest supertrees. Algorithmica, 21:181–210, 1998.

16

[8] Hidovic. Metrics for attributed graphs based on the maximal similarity common subgraph. International Journal of Pattern Recognition and Artificial Intelligence, 18:299–313, 2004. [9] Andrew R. Leach and Valerie J. Gillet. An introduction to chemoinformatics. Springer, 2003. ISBN 1402013477, 9781402013478. [10] Ray M. Marin.

Caracterización de superficies de potencial elec-

trostático molecular (spem) para fragmentos del tallo aceptor del trna(ala). Master’s thesis, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, 2007. [11] Jeremy S. Meredith, Gonzalo Alvarez, Thomas A. Maier, Thomas C. Schulthess, and Jeffrey S. Vetter.

Accuracy and performance of

graphics processors: A quantum monte carlo application case study. Parallel Comput., 35(3):151–163, 2009. [12] Edgar E. Daza Ray M. Marin, Nestor F. Aguirre. Graph theoretical similarity approach to compare molecular electrostatic potentials. Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, 48:109–118, 2008. [13] John W. Raymond. Rascal: Calculation of graph similarity using maximum common edge subgraphs.

The Computer Journal, 45

(6):631–644, 2002. [14] Schmidt. Tree-puzzle: maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis using quartets and parallel computing. Bioinformatics application note, 18:502–504, 2002. [15] Cristianini Nello Shawe-Taylor John. Kernel Methods for Pattern Analysis. Cambridge University Press, 2004.

17

[16] John E. Stone, James C. Phillips, Peter L. Freddolino, David J. Hardy, Leonardo G. Trabuco, and Klaus Schulten.

Accelerating

molecular modeling applications with graphics processors. Journal of Computational Chemistry, 28(16):2618–2640, 2007. [17] Kim Shearer Svetha, Kim Shearer, Svetha Venkatesh, and Horst Bunke. An efficient least common subgraph algorithm for video indexing. In Int. Conf. on Pattern Recognition, pages 1241–1243, 1998.

18

Parallel Computing System for the efficient ...

tree construction and comparison processes for a set of molecules. Fur- thermore, in .... The abstractions and virtualization of processing resources provided by.

132KB Sizes 2 Downloads 288 Views

Recommend Documents

Parallel Computing System for efficient computation of ...
Parallel programming considerations. • The general process is executed over the CPU. – Host Code: C++. • The string comparison process is made in parallel.

Parallel Computing System for e cient computation of ...
Host Code: C++. The string comparison process is made in parallel. Device Code: CUDA for C. Raul Torres. Parallel Computing System for e cient computation ...

Efficient parallel inversion using the ... - Semantic Scholar
Nov 1, 2006 - Centre for Advanced Data Inference, Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian ..... (what we will call the canonical version), and then.

Efficient parallel inversion using the ... - Semantic Scholar
Nov 1, 2006 - Centre for Advanced Data Inference, Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT. 0200 ... in other ensemble-based inversion or global optimization algorithms. ... based, which means that they involve

Efficient Distributed Quantum Computing
Nov 16, 2012 - 3Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering, University of Washington, .... fixed low-degree graph (see Tab. 2 ... With degree O(log N) the over-.

Efficient Distributed Quantum Computing
Nov 16, 2012 - tum circuit to a distributed quantum computer in which each ... Additionally, we prove that this is the best you can do; a 1D nearest neighbour machine .... Of course there is a price to pay: the overhead depends on the topology ...

Parallel Computing Technologies -
Sep 4, 2015 - storage and retrieval, electronic adaptation, computer software, or by similar or dissimilar methodology now known or hereafter .... (CP2K): IBM Regatta 690+ [8], Cray XT3 and XT5 [15], IBM BlueGene/P [2] and K-100 cluster of Keldysh ..

The PARCTAB Mobile Computing System
since March 1993 at the Computer Science Lab at Xerox PARC. The system currently ... computer; though it does permit object code and data downloading.

An Efficient Parallel Dynamics Algorithm for Simulation ...
portant factors when authoring optimized software. ... systems which run the efficient O(n) solution with ... cated accounting system to avoid formulation singu-.

An Efficient Deterministic Parallel Algorithm for Adaptive ... - ODU
Center for Accelerator Science. Old Dominion University. Norfolk, Virginia 23529. Desh Ranjan. Department of Computer Science. Old Dominion University.

The Relevance of Effective Database System for Efficient Office ... - IJRIT
Keyword: Database Security, Database System, Office Management, Oracle 11g, SQL, ... describe the nesting, and a sort field to keep the records in a particular order in .... Proper Documentation: Program flowcharts serve as a good program ...

The Relevance of Effective Database System for Efficient Office ... - IJRIT
Oracle database 11g comes in handy to solve and enhance data storage and retrieval offering ..... A hard disk minimum size of 50GB. 2. A minimum of duo core ...

PDF Download Parallel Computing for Data Science ...
Science: With Examples in R, C++ and CUDA ... It includes examples not only from the classic "n observations, p variables" matrix format but also ... R Packages.

Parallel Learning to Rank for Information Retrieval - SFU Computing ...
General Terms: Algorithms, Performance. Keywords: Learning to rank, Parallel algorithms, Cooper- ... Overview. Evolutionary algorithms (EAs) are stochastic.

PDF Read Parallel Computing for Data Science: With ...
from time series, network graph models, and numerous other structures common ... examples illustrate the range of issues encountered in parallel programming.