IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 3, Issue 5, May 2015, Pg. 413-420

International Journal of Research in Information Technology (IJRIT) www.ijrit.com ISSN 2001-5569

Image segmentation approach for tacking the object: A Survey and New Directions 1

Harshvardhan1, Shabnam Sangwan2, Surya Kiran3, Sunita Sangwan4 Student, Department of CSE, Satkabir Institute of Technology & Management (SKITM) Bahadurgarh, Haryana, India [email protected] 2

A.P, Department of CSE, Satkabir Institute of Technology & Management (SKITM) Bahadurgarh, Haryana, India [email protected]

3

A.P, Department of CSE, Satkabir Institute of Technology & Management (SKITM) Bahadurgarh, Haryana, India [email protected] 4

A.P, Department of CSE, P.D.M. College of Engineering (PDMCE) Bahadurgarh, Haryana, India [email protected]

Abstract Image segmentation is an important technology for image processing. Image segmentation is an important research area in digital image processing with several applications in vision-guided autonomous robotics, product quality inspection, medical diagnosis, the analysis of remotely sensed images, etc there are many applications whether on synthesis of the objects or computer graphic images require precise segmentation. With the consideration of the characteristics of each object composing images in MPEG4, object-based segmentation cannot be ignored. Nowadays, sports programs are among the most popular programs, and there is no doubt that viewers’ interest is concentrated on the athletes. Therefore, demand for image segmentation of sport scenes is very high in terms of both visual compression and image handling using extracted athletes. In this work, a new approach to fully automatic color image segmentation, called JSEG, is presented. First, colors in the image are quantized to several representing classes that can be used to differentiate regions in the image. Then, image pixel colors are replaced by their corresponding color class labels, thus forming a class-map of the image. Experiments show that JSEG provides good segmentation results on a variety of images. The aim of image segmentation can be defined as partitioning an image into homogeneous regions in terms of the features of pixels extracted from the image. Keywords—Antnet; routing algorithm; antsim; Ants-based algorithm

1. Introduction An important area of digital image processing is the segmentation of an image into homogeneous regions. Image segmentation is one of the most challenging problems of digital image processing and many different approaches and methods have been proposed in the literature. However, there is still not an exact solution that can be applied to all image types and obtains perfect results. Color image segmentation is useful in many applications. From the segmentation results, it is possible to identify regions of interest and objects in the scene, which is very beneficial to the subsequent image analysis or annotation. Recent work includes a variety of techniques: for example, stochastic model based approaches [1], [4], [8], [11], [12], morphological watershed based region growing [9], energy diffusion [7], and graph partitioning [10]. Quantitative evaluation methods have also been suggested [2]. However, due to the difficult nature of the problem, there are few automatic algorithms that can work well on a large variety of data.

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 3, Issue 5, May 2015, Pg. 413-420

The problem of segmentation is difficult because of image texture. If an image contains only homogeneous color regions, clustering methods in color space such as [3] are sufficient to handle the problem. In reality, natural scenes are rich in color and texture. It is difficult to identify image regions containing color-texture patterns. The approach taken in this work assumes the following: • Each region in the image contains a uniformly distributed color-texture pattern. • The color information in each image region can be represented by a few quantized colors, which is true for most color images of natural scenes. • The colors between two neighboring regions are distinguishable - a basic assumption of any color image segmentation algorithm. The goal of image segmentation is to cluster pixels into salient image regions, i.e., regions corresponding to individual surfaces, objects, or natural parts of objects. An image may be defined as a two-dimensional function, f(x, y), where x and y are spatial (plane) coordinates, and the amplitude of f at any pair of coordinates (x, y) is called the intensity or gray level of the image at that point. When x, y, and the amplitude values of f are all finite, discrete quantities, we call the image a digital image. The field of digital image processing refers to processing digital images by means of a digital computer. Note that a digital image is composed of a finite number of elements, each of which has a particular location and value. These elements are referred to as picture elements, image elements, and pixels. Colour has two main uses in image processing 1. Identification: Colour is a power description tool, for example, the red apple versus the brown apple (you know which to eat). 2. Discrimination: Colour is a separate, independent sensation from shape or motion. Humans can discriminate about 300,000-400,000 colours but only about 24 gray values (locally), so the presentation of image data in colour is more easily interpreted by humans Colour image processing can be divided into two major types: 1. Full colour where image data is acquired in full 24 bit colour and processed that way and 2. Pseudo-colour where colours are used instead of grayvalue shades to present data.

2. Definition of Segmentation Image segmentation is a low-level image processing task that aims at partitioning an image into homogeneous regions in terms of the features of pixels extracted from the image [1]. The definition of region homogeneity depends on the application. Examples for such homogeneity features are pixel gray level, pixel RGB color, range of the pixel from the camera, position of the pixel, local covariance matrix, etc. As already defined, image segmentation is a low-level image processing task that aims at partitioning an image into homogeneous regions in terms of the features of pixels extracted from the image [1]. A more formal definition of image segmentation can be given in the following way [3]: Let I denote an image and let H define a certain “homogeneity predicate”; then the segmentation of I is a partition P of I into a set of N regions Rn , n = 1, …,N, such that:

Here, Condition 1 states that the partition has to cover the whole image, whereas Condition 2 indicates that each region has to be homogeneous with respect to the predicate H, and finally Condition 3 states that the two adjacent regions cannot be merged into a single region that satisfies the predicate H. In a large number of applications in image processing and computer vision, segmentation plays a fundamental role as the first step before applying to images higher-level operations, such as recognition,

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 3, Issue 5, May 2015, Pg. 413-420

semantic interpretation and representation. Image segmentation has important applications in vision-guided autonomous robotics, product quality inspection, medical diagnosis and the analysis of remotely sensed images [3]. The problem of image segmentation is an important research field and many segmentation methods have been proposed in the literature. The methods can be divided into 4 main categories: 1. clustering methods, 2. region-based methods, 3. hybrid methods, and 4. Bayesian methods. 2.1 Clustering Methods Clustering may be defined as the process of organizing objects into groups whose members are similar in some way. The following definitions may be functional [4]: i.

A cluster is a set of entities, which are “alike”, while entities from different clusters are not “alike”.

ii. A cluster is an aggregation of points in the test space such that the distance between any two points in the cluster is less than the distance between any point in the cluster and any point not in it. iii. Clusters may be described as connected regions of a multi-dimensional space containing a relatively high density of points, separated from other such regions by a region containing a relatively low density of points. Research into clustering algorithms has been useful in many applications, mainly in the field of pattern recognition and data mining. Clustering methods can be divided into two categories: hierarchical and partitional [5]. Within each of the types there exists a wealth of subtypes and different algorithms for finding the clusters. 1. Hierarchical Clustering Hierarchical clustering techniques are based on the use of a proximity matrix indicating the similarity between every pair of data points to be clustered. The end result is a tree of clusters, called a dendrogram representing the nested grouping of patterns and similarity levels at which groupings change. It proceeds successively by either merging smaller clusters into larger ones (agglomerative, bottom-up), or by splitting larger clusters (divisive, top-down). By cutting the dendrogram at a desired level, a clustering of data items into disjoint groups is obtained. The clustering methods differ in regards to the rules by which two small clusters are merged or a large cluster is split. Some of the hierarchical algorithms include Cobweb, Cure and Chameleon [5]. 2. Partitional Clustering Partitional clustering attempts to directly decompose the data set into a set of disjoint clusters. An objective function expresses the wellness of a representation, and then the clustering algorithm tries to minimize this function in order to obtain the best representation. Partitional algorithms are categorized into Partitioning Relocation Algorithms and Density-Based Partitioning. Algorithms of the first type are further categorized into Probabilistic Clustering (SNOB), K-Medoids, and K-Means. The second type of partitional algorithms are called Density-Based Partitioning, they include algorithms such as Dbscan, Optics Dbclasd, Denclue, Gdbscan [5]. A hierarchical clustering is a nested sequence of partitions, whereas a partition clustering is a single partition. Thus, a hierarchical clustering is a special sequence of partitional clustering. At the end of hierarchical clustering process, one cluster tree is formed. Traveling down the branches, the subsequent merge steps can be seen. Using hierarchical clustering is only practical on small data sets. Hierarchical clustering methods are clearly not practical in image segmentation process [4]. Partitional clustering techniques such as, K-means clustering and ISODATA have an advantage over the hierarchical clustering techniques, where a partition of the data points which optimizes some criterion functions. In hierarchical clustering once a data point is assigned to a particular cluster, it cannot be altered. Therefore, if a data point is incorrectly assigned to a particular cluster at an early stage, there is no way to correct the error. However, there is also a disadvantage of the partitional clustering techniques on how to determine the number of clusters, K [5].

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 3, Issue 5, May 2015, Pg. 413-420

2.2 Region-Based Methods The region-based methods try to isolate areas of images that are homogeneous according to given set of characteristics. Two classical region-based methods are seeded region growing and split-and-merge [6]. 1. Seeded Region Growing Seeded region growing is one of the most simple and popular region-based segmentation algorithms. It starts by choosing a (or some) starting point (or seed pixel). Then, the region grows by successively adding neighboring pixels that are similar, according to a certain homogeneity criterion, increasing step by step the size of the region. This criterion can be, for example, to require that the variance of a feature does not exceed a threshold, or that the difference between the pixel and the average of the region is small. The growing process is continued until a pixel not sufficiently similar to be aggregated is obtained. It means that the pixel belongs to another object and the growing in this direction is complete. Monitoring the procedure gives an impression of regions in the interior of objects growing until boundaries correspond with the edges of the object. Important problems of seeded region growing are the selection of initial seeds that properly represent regions and the suitable homogeneity criterion to be used during the growing process [6]. 2. Split-and-Merge One of the basic properties of segmentation is the existence of a predicate P which measures the region homogeneity. If this predicate is not satisfied for some region, it means that that region is inhomogeneous and should be split into sub regions. On the other hand, if the predicate is satisfied for the union of two adjacent regions, then these regions are collectively homogeneous and should be merged into a single region [1][2]. A method towards the satisfaction of these homogeneity criteria is the split-andmerge algorithm. This technique consists, as its name denotes, of two basic steps. First, the image is recursively split until all the regions verify a homogeneity criterion. Next, in a second step, all adjacent regions are reassembled in a way that resulting regions satisfy the homogeneity criterion. The steps are shown in Fig 1 The procedure can be summarized as follows [8][9]: i) If for any region Ri, P(Ri) = FALSE, then split Ri, into four sub quadrants. ii) If for any adjacent regions Ri, and Rj, P(Ri U Rj ) = TRUE, merge them. iii) If no further splitting or merging is possible, stop. Else go to step 1.

Figure 2.1: Split-and-merge segmentation, (a) original image, (b) initial split in four square blocks, (c) splitting of the image in homogeneous blocks and (d) final segmentation after the merging.

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 3, Issue 5, May 2015, Pg. 413-420

A quad-tree structure is often used to affect the step of splitting: it is based on the recursive decomposition of the regions that does not satisfy the homogeneity criterion into four squared sub regions, starting from the whole image. Therefore, an inverse pyramidal structure is built. The merging step consists of merging the adjacent blocks which represent homogeneous regions but have been divided by the regular decomposition [6]. Split-and-merge method does not suffer from predetermination of number of regions, or any other constraints. However, the main drawback is the artificial blocking effects on the resulting region boundaries [9]. The main advantage offered by region-based methods is that the regions obtained are certainly spatially connected and rather compact. Recursive Shortest-Spanning Tree algorithm [9], as will be explained in Chapter 3, is another popular region-based algorithm. 2.3 Hybrid Methods Hybrid image segmentation methods combine the principles of two or more primitive image segmentation techniques, either in a hierarchical or parallel manner to segment the images [5]. As mentioned in previous sections, both clustering methods and region-based methods have advantages and disadvantages. Hybrid methods aim to get use of advantageous parts of different techniques. For example, clustering methods usually suffer from unconnected and scattered regions. The appropriate use of a regionbased algorithm may help to overcome this problem. A typical example for hybrid methods is K-Means with Connectivity Constraint (KMC) algorithm [12], in which an initial K-Means clustering is further refined by considering the spatial coherence of neighboring pixels. 2.4 Bayesian Methods Bayesian methods use probability calculus to quantify the plausibility of a hypothesis. In the case of image segmentation, this hypothesis is about the existence of a particular “hidden field” (label field realization) along with the data. A prior knowledge, which can be exploited to improve the results, is used to regularize the inference of the hidden field, given the data. Formal optimization techniques are then used to work on the posterior inference. The Bayes rule states that:

i.e. the posterior probability P(L|X) of the label field given the data is proportional to the product of the model probability P(X|L) and the prior probability of the label realizations P(L). P(L) is defined using local information about the expected segmentation result (such as shape, etc.) and aims at encouraging spatial connectivity. [15] The prior probability model for the segmentation label field is usually assumed to be a Gibbs random field (GRF), which expresses the expectations about the spatial properties of the segmentation, i.e., the GRF assigns higher probabilities to the segmentation fields having connected regions. The feature image is explicitely assumed as the summation of two parts; one is a piecewise constant function, and the other is a Gaussian white noise with zero mean, µ, and variance, σ2. The segmentation is achieved by maximizing the a posteriori probability of the segmentation field, given the observed feature image. The mathematical formulation is as follows: The segmentation label field Z(x,y) is modeled by

where U(z) is the Gibbs potential and is defined by

Here C is the set of all cliques, and Vc is the individual clique potential whose value depends only on z(x,y) where xy∈ C. A clique is a set of points, c, which are all neighbours of each other. Clique examples for first order and second order neighbourhood systems are shown in Fig. 2.2 [17]. Spatial connectivity of regions

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 3, Issue 5, May 2015, Pg. 413-420

can be imposed by assigning low values to Vc(z), if z(x,y) is constant for all xy∈ C and high values otherwise.

Figure 2: Clique examples for (a) first order neighbourhood system, (b) second order neighbourhood system

3. Observation for Segmentation for exist method Following observation will be observe in existing method 3.1 C clustering method • The quality of the segmentation depends on the image. Smoothly shaded surfaces with clear graylevel steps between different surfaces are ideal for the above algorithms. • Humans probably use object recognition in conjunction with segmentation, although the machine algorithms exhibited above do not. • For relatively simple images it is plausible that machine segmentations, such as those shown on Figure 3, are useful for several visual tasks, including object recognition. • For more complex images (Figure. 5, 6), the machine segmentations provide a less reliable indicator for surface boundaries, and their utility for subsequent processing becomes questionable. • While many segmentation algorithms work well with simple examples, they will all break down given examples with enough clutter and camouflage. The assessment of segmentation algorithms therefore needs to be done on standardized datasets. Current Goal Provide a brief introduction to the current image segmentation literature, including:  Feature space clustering approaches.  Graph-based approaches. • Discuss the inherent assumptions different approaches make about what constitutes a good segment. • Emphasize general mathematical tools that are promising. • Discuss metrics for evaluating the results.

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 3, Issue 5, May 2015, Pg. 413-420

Figure 3: C clustering segmentation 3.2 Mean-Shift Segmentations The label for an arbitrary pixel ~x0 denotes the mode that the mean shift iterations (4) converge to, when started at the feature F0 = F (x0). That is, the segments produced by mean-shift are defined to be the domains of convergence (aka watersheds) of the mean-shift iterations. Properties: 1. Convergence: 2. Anti-edge Detection 3. Fragmentation of Constant Gradient Regions

Figure 4: Mean-shift Segmentation

4. New Approach : Segmentation The Segmentation Dataset [9, 11] provides image segmentations done by humans. As stated on the dataset’s webpage: The goal of this work is to provide an empirical and scientific basis for research on image segmentation and boundary detection. The public portion of this dataset consists of the segmentations of 300 images by roughly 5 humans each, done separately for grey level and colour versions of the images. We combine C Mean Clustering and hybrid segmentation for approaching a new method for segmentation.

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IJRIT International Journal of Research in Information Technology, Volume 3, Issue 5, May 2015, Pg. 413-420

5. Conclusion and future scope In this work, a new approach for fully automatic color image segmentation, called JPEG, is presented. The segmentation consists of color quantization and spatial segmentation. A criterion for “good” segmentation is proposed. These segmentations appear to be consistent, except different subjects have decided to resolve particular regions into more or less detail. This variability should be taken into account in a quantitative comparison of two segmentations. In our experiments, several limitations are found for the algorithm. One case is when two neighbor regions do not have a clear boundary, for example, the small trees in Fig. 6. Another case is how to handle the varying shades of an object due to the illumination. For example, the big tree trunk in Fig. 6 is segmented into several parts due to the shades. Future research work is on how to solve these problems and improve the results. In future we can adjust the cluster with desire value remove this problem Acknowledgment I would like to thanks my worthy guide Ms. Shabnam Sangwan, who suggested me to work and research Information Security Risk Management. Her recommendations, innovative ideas and constructive criticism contributed to make the success of this report. Her numerous suggestions, comments, and advice have made this entire paper possible.

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